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"VariaLift Airships  ARH-50"    
Varailift is a unique heavy lift and transport solution. There is nothing else quite like it in the World – with a carrying capacity from One Tonne up to 1000 Tonnes and made out of aluminium, this carrying solution has to be the vehicle of the future.

This new name in aviation transport is one to look out for. Designed and developed by Alan Handley, design engineer and owner of the IPR and worldwide patents, Valialift will soon be developed in partnership with a world class manufacturer. This website is to tell you more about this great idea and help raise awareness, investment and capital funding to get this project, quite literally – off the ground.

Specification:      ARH-50

Max payload  50 metric Tons Payload bay size 100 Meters long    50 Meters Wide
Construction Rigid all aluminium Max Altitude 3000 Meters
Max Speed (Subject to test) Length 150 Meters
Width 52 Meters Height  40 Meters
Gross Weight  200 Metric Tons Gross Lift 255 Metric Tons
Variable Lift 55 Metric Tons Weight on ground unladen      5 Metric Tons
 Lifting Gas Helium (none-flammable)

http://www.varialift.com/5-9-.htm

http://www.varialift.com/

 

"Lockheed-Martin  P-791"    

 

Oct 30 2007

 

Lockheed to take wraps off top-secret air project?
Hybrid would use gas for buoyancy, but fly like plane

 

 

A scientist from a top-secret Lockheed Martin hybrid airships research project that has never been spoken about in public will be in Winnipeg this week addressing the Airships to the Arctic conference.

The advance buzz is that his presence may mean Lockheed will use the fourth annual Winnipeg conference -- which is becoming a must-attend event for airship aficionados from around the world -- as the venue to finally spill the beans on the secret airship project.

Lockheed has confirmed it is developing such a craft that uses lighter-than-air gas for lift, but also has engines and wings to fly like an airplane. However, it will not say anything more. The airship would be capable of carrying heavy loads across significant distances.

Like the wizards in the fictional world of the Harry Potter books who will not say the name of their nemesis out loud, company officials will not even utter the name of the project -- P-791.

Virtually the only public knowledge of the project came about after Lockheed took it for a short test flight in February 2006 and it was observed and photographed by passers-by.

But Melissa Dalton, a Lockheed spokeswoman at its research facility in Palmdale, Calif., northeast of Los Angeles, said the official's planned address for the conference will be about buoyant systems in general and not about the unmentionable P-791 in particular.

 has been replaced by another Lockheed scientist.

Step forward

Dr. Robert (Bob) Boyd, the hybrid lift portfolio manager at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, advanced development programs, or "SkunkWorks" in California, was originally scheduled to attend. But Dalton said Boyd was unable to make the trip at the last minute and Eric Hofstatter who works on the same team as Boyd will be here instead.

Regardless of what Hofstatter is going to say, the fact that Lockheed Martin is venturing out of the research lab to even talk about the concept is seen as step forward for the fledgling airship business.

Barry Prentice, the University of Manitoba transportation professor who has co-founded a non-profit organization called ISO Polar Airships to organize these conferences, is enthusiastic about advances being made in the development of the technology.

Prentice and others believe heavy-lift airships can become an important solution to the challenges of development in northern Canada, where there are few all-season roads and a short winter road season that is getting shorter because of global warming.

"We really think these airships can improve the lives of people in the North," Prentice said. "We're getting more people to come around and at least give it a hard look."

In addition to the Lockheed Martin presenter, Hokan Colting, the president of a Newmarket, Ont. company called 21st Century Airships, will confirm his company's intentions to fly a brand new prototype to Winnipeg next spring. martin.cash@freepress.mb.ca

February 2006

Lockheed Martin's Secretly Built Airship Makes First Flight

 

Lockheed Martin Advanced Development Projects is making perhaps the first realistic tests of a hybrid airship--a concept that dates back many decades but that is just now being tried at a significant scale.

The Skunk Works had secretly built the craft and hoped for a quiet first flight at its Palmdale, Calif., facility, but a few passers-by noticed the strange object in the sky.

The Defense Dept. is showing interest in two categories of airships--those that can carry large cargo at low altitude, exemplified by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) Walrus program, and those that can operate in high-altitude low-wind conditions and remain on station for long periods of time. The configuration of the Skunks Works ship indicates it is the former--a hybrid heavy-load carrier. 

The Skunk Works made the first flight of its "P-791" testbed on Jan. 31 at its facility on the Palmdale Air Force Plant 42 airport. The manned flight was about a 5-min. circuit around the airport in the morning and appeared to be successful. The company did not announce or want to discuss the flight

TO GAIN MORE SPAN TO ACT LIKE a wing, the P-791 is three pressurized lobes joined together. An observer of the first flight says it was about the size of three Fuji blimps blended together. The Fuji blimp, a Skyship 600 model, is 206 ft. long. That suggests the P-791 would have a gross lift of roughly 3-5 tons.

The observer saw the craft performing very tight 360-deg. turns while taxiing. It made a brief takeoff roll, climbed to a low altitude, made a few banks--including a long sweeping turn--then came back and landed. The landing approach had a nose-down body attitude that levelled for the flare. The flight was very smooth, the observer says. The craft was flown by P-791 Chief Test Pilot Eric P. Hansen.

The speed of the testbed was estimated at about 20 kt. A full-scale version would be able to go much faster, over 100 kt. Lockheed Martin has long proposed a large transport airship, at one time called the Aerocraft, which was halted around 2000 (AW&ST Feb. 22, 1999, p. 26). That design was about 800 ft. long and was to carry 1-1.2 million lb. at 125 kt. The Skunk Works was one of two contractors to receive one-year, $3-million Darpa contracts in August 2005 to study Walrus. The second Walrus phase would be a three-year demonstration effort.  more>>>

 

"DYNALIFTER"  Ohio Airships

October 2006

It's a hybrid airship--part plane, part dirigible. Two Ohio inventors think production versions up to 990 feet long will launch a new era of aviation--one where low and slow is the way to go.

 

C'est un dirigeable hybride - avion & dirigeable. Deux inventeurs de l'Ohio pensent à la version production de 990 pieds. Le début d'une nouvelle ère de l'aviation - Un moyen de de déplacer lentement et près du sol.   Octobre 2006

 

The future of aviation is wobbling. Looking like a giant albino queen ant, the 117-ft.-long Dynalifter airship trundles down a grass airstrip in eastern Ohio, its white, ovoid envelope bobbling with each clod and divot in the runway. Undersize wings poke out from the airship's midsection, ailerons fluttering, as co-inventor Brian Martin steers from a cannibalized ultralight cockpit slung under the canopy. He turns the ship around at the end of the runway, lines it up with the main axis of the strip and throttles up the twin 100-hp Rotax 583 engines. The great bobbing mass accelerates slowly until it is lumbering along at 30 mph. more>>>

 

 

 

"AEROSCRAFT"  Aeros

Summer 2006

The Flying Luxury Hotel
Tomorrow's cruise ship will sail through the air, not the water     

 

This is not a Blimp. It's a sort of flying Queen Mary 2 that could change the way you think about air travel. It's the Aeroscraft, and when it's completed, it will ferry pampered passengers across continents and oceans as they stroll leisurely about the one-acre cabin or relax in their well-appointed staterooms.

Unlike its dirigible ancestors, the Aeroscraft is not lighter than air. Its 14 million cubic feet of helium hoist only two thirds of the craft's weight. The rigid and surprisingly aerodynamic body—driven by huge rearward propellers—generates enough additional lift to keep the behemoth and its 400-ton payload aloft while cruising. During takeoff and landing, six turbofan jet engines push the ship up or ease its descent.

Aeroscraft
Purpose: Long-range travel for passengers who are more concerned with the journey than the destination
Dimensions (feet): 165 h x 244 w x 647 l   Max Speed: 174 mph   Range: 6,000 miles   Capacity: 250 passengers

 http://www.aerosml.com/Aeroscraft%20Info.asp

October 2003

Aeros Awarded a U.S. Department of Defense Contract for the High Altitude Airship Program

The U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA), recently awarded the Aeros Company a contract for Phase I development of the High Altitude Airship (HAA) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Program.

http://calbears.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_pwwi/is_200304/ai_mark01053079/pg_1

"ATLAS" 
"Av-Intel USA.  Cargo Airship" 
"Blackwater Airships. LLC" 

18 January 2006

Airship market balloons

 

Blackwater USA's rendering of one of the new airships that it is developing. Loaded with sensors and surveillance cameras, it will hover above a battlefield and relay information to clients miles away, the company says.After building a business defending high-ranking officials in Iraq, Blackwater USA executives think the future may be hovering above the battlefield.

The North Carolina company is developing an airship — think Goodyear blimp — loaded with sensors and surveillance cameras that can quickly relay information about the ground below to clients miles away.

"If bad guys are setting up IEDs [improvised explosive devices] on the side of the road, we can see real-time what's going on," said Chris Taylor, Blackwater's vice president for strategic initiatives, referring to improvised explosive devices, which have proved deadly against U.S. troops in Iraq.

The company's first airship should be ready by year's end, he said, though it has no customers lined up.

Blackwater's move is only the most dramatic of the diversification plans private security companies are undertaking. >>>more

 

 

"CARGOLIFTER CL160" 

18 July 2005

CargoLifter-Crew will mit "Luftschiffen light" neu starten

Von Nikolaus Doll

Berlin - Puderzuckerfeiner Sand knirscht, Palmen rauschen und Samoanerinnen wiegen sich zu Südseemelodien - für Berliner ist Klein-Polynesien zum Greifen nah seit das "Tropical Island" im Örtchen Brand Atoll-Atmosphäre in die weltweit größte freitragende Halle gezaubert hat. Doch Carl-Heinrich von Gablenz, sonst kein Tropenmuffel, hat "wenig Lust, jemals da reinzugehen". Denn in dieser Halle sollte sein Traum, die Werft für Luftschiffe der CargoLifter AG, wahr werden. Die Vision platzte, doch inzwischen hat Gablenz nicht mehr diesen bitteren Beigeschmack, wenn er an das Spaßbad denkt. Denn der ehemalige Vorstandschef der AG i. I. hat erneut Mitstreiter, neue Gesellschaften gegründet, frisches Kapital - und die alte Idee: den Bau von Luftschiffen.

Luftfahrtexperten schütteln den Kopf, und im Bundeswirtschaftsministerium heißt es zur Mischung Luftschiffbau plus von Gablenz nur: "Chancenlos, der Mann ist verbrannt." Doch von Gablenz, seit der Insolvenz von CargoLifter im Aufsichtsrat der börsennotierten AG, hat vor wenigen Tagen die CL CargoLifter GmbH & Co. KGaA gegründet sowie die CLifter GmbH als Komplementärin - und bereits ein Finanzpolster angelegt. "Innerhalb von drei Wochen sind rund 100 000 Euro reingekommen", sagte Mirko Hörmann, Geschäftsführer von CLifter.

Ein bescheidener Neuanfang. Als CargoLifter vor drei Jahren Pleite ging, war das im Brandenburg der Ära Manfred Stolpe (SPD) der Wirtschafts-Gau. Mehr als 300 Mio. Euro verbrannten, die 74 000 Aktionäre hielten über Nacht wertlose Papiere in den Händen. Die CargoLifter-Aktie, zeitweilig mit rund 24 Euro notiert, dümpelte am Freitag bei 0,091 Euro. >>>more

 

"FIRST" 
"SKYCAT Series" 

World SkyCat Ltd

 

Hopes to restore Cardington as centre of airship production     19 October 2007

 

A business hoping to restore Cardington as a centre of airship production welcomed the go-ahead for a new 425 housing scheme cat and the promised revamp of Number One Shed.

Hybrid Air Vehicles Ltd is the new name of a company which emerged from the Cardington-based SkyCat Group.
Gordon Taylor, director of marketing and sales, said the rebranded firm was pressing ahead with plans for a helium-filled aircraft capable of lifting 20-tonnes, the SkyCat 20, with potential uses as a freight and passenger carrier lined up.    And he added that the machine could be built at Cardington if all goes well.
Mr Taylor said: "If we had the commitment today, and we are moving close, we could have one flying in 24 months and certified for flight in 30 to 36 months.  "It could be built at

Cardington, and that's why I am delighted at the planning approval, as we could use Number One Shed. We could use both sheds, but that depends on Warner Bros."
Advanced Technologies Group (ATG) was a previous presence at Cardington before going into administration in 2005.
It was salvaged the following year and re-emerged as the part-British, part Italian-owned SkyCat Group.
As Hybrid Air Vehicles, it has been re-formed as a British venture pushing designs for a range of SkyCat aircraft with payloads of up to 1000 tonnes.
Current hopes are for attracting interest from mining and oil companies, which need cargo shifted to inaccessible areas, and even for "eco-tourism", such as carrying travellers to the Mayan ruins in Mexico.
Despite the largest SkyCat to so far take to the air being only a14-metre long prototype, Mr Taylor said he was "very optimistic" about the company's future.

 

 

http://www.bedfordtoday.co.uk/bed-news/Hopes-to-restore-Cardington-as.3396236.jp

 

 

 

Airship may link historic cities   BBC-NEW 5 October 2007

 

A futuristic passenger airship could provide commuters with a new link between two historic cities.

The Skycat helium balloon would float passengers from Cambridge to Oxford in an hour.

The project is being developed at the Cardington sheds in Bedfordshire, the home of the UK's airship industry.

But Advanced Technologies Group must find funding and get permission to use the airspace before the 21st Century airship gets off the ground.

A Cambridge to Oxford aeroplane service has already failed because of a lack of commuters but the company believes there is a market for Skycat.

High value jobs

Gordon Taylor of Advanced Technologies Group said: "Our teams have been working for over 35 years flying traditional airships and nobody even sprained an ankle."

"Its a very safe form of transportation."

Corrine Garbett of Huntingdonshire District Council said: "In Huntingdonshire we have a number of employment sites including some redundant airbases which would lend themselves perfectly to the manufacturing of component parts for the aviation industry.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/7030994.st

 

new SkyCat family of air vehicles.

Capable of landing virtually anywhere on land or water without need of ground infrastructure and carrying payloads ranging from 20 to 1,000 tons, the SkyCat hybrid air vehicles offer a uniquely flexible and cost-effective solution to a broad spectrum of market and mission requirements.

We are the launch customer for the first SkyCat-20, scheduled to make its maiden flight end-2008. We plan to take this historic new air vehicle on a 6-month grand World Tour

http://www.worldskycat.com/

 

 

 
"WALRUS    Near-Space" Blimps

 

"According to Inside Defense, a 90-day Air Force study has concluded that there would be "military utility" in putting blimps, balloons, and drones in near space—between 65,000 and 350,000 above sea level. Up there, they could serve as cheap substitutes for satellites, relaying communications and snooping on foes. They might be able to carry equipment, effectively becoming giant U-Hauls in the sky. And this could be done, at least in the balloons' case, without "significantly strain[ing] existing infrastructure or requir[ing] large amounts of equipment or personnel to operate the balloons," Inside Defense says."

"Near space" is often considered too high for most aircraft and too low for satellites. Now FOX News adds additional background, and notes that the USAF is considering seeking up to $15 million on near-space operations and research in its 2007 budget, much of which will be focused on balloons and LTAs.

One simple prototype, dubbed "Combat SkySat," was tested in the skies over Arizona in January through March with a series of 12 test launches. Kirtland Air Force Base NM is also involved in testing near-space craft. People mentioned in the FOX article include Lt. Col. Edward B. Tomme of the Air Force Space Command's Space Warfare Center; Lt. Col. Toby Volz of Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, CO; and the the Air Force's Chief of Staff, Gen. John Jumper.

The FOX News article goes on to detail the hazards and difficulties involved, incuding higher level of corrosive ozone and UV rays, the new infrastructure required for LTAs, and launch times.

DID has noted the U.S. military's increased interest in baloons, blimps and related lighter-than-air craft (LTAs) as transports, communications relays, and sesnor platforms. In Support Rising for Near-Space Blimps, DefenseTech.org reports:

"According to Inside Defense, a 90-day Air Force study has concluded that there would be "military utility" in putting blimps, balloons, and drones in near space—between 65,000 and 350,000 above sea level. Up there, they could serve as cheap substitutes for satellites, relaying communications and snooping on foes. They might be able to carry equipment, effectively becoming giant U-Hauls in the sky. And this could be done, at least in the balloons' case, without "significantly strain[ing] existing infrastructure or requir[ing] large amounts of equipment or personnel to operate the balloons," Inside Defense says."

"Near space" is often considered too high for most aircraft and too low for satellites. Now FOX News adds additional background, and notes that the USAF is considering seeking up to $15 million on near-space operations and research in its 2007 budget, much of which will be focused on balloons and LTAs.

One simple prototype, dubbed "Combat SkySat," was tested in the skies over Arizona in January through March with a series of 12 test launches. Kirtland Air Force Base NM is also involved in testing near-space craft. People mentioned in the FOX article include Lt. Col. Edward B. Tomme of the Air Force Space Command's Space Warfare Center; Lt. Col. Toby Volz of Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, CO; and the the Air Force's Chief of Staff, Gen. John Jumper.

The FOX News article goes on to detail the hazards and difficulties involved, incuding higher level of corrosive ozone and UV rays, the new infrastructure required for LTAs, and launch times

Potential benefits include the creation of an additional resource available at the battlefield command level rather than the national asset level of spy satellites, freeing expensive satellites up for other tasks. Other benefits include improved pictures and easier eavesdropping on low-power communications duwe to greater proximity, relative cheapness when compared to advanced satellite programs and establishing cellular networks, and the ability to remain on station for very long periods of time. Finally, many of these craft are both outside the normal range of many aircraft and SAMs and resist deflating quickly when punctured, because the pressure inside is close to that of the surrounding air.

The fact that "near space," unlike outer space, is considered part of a country's airspace and hence sovereign territory is considered both a positive and a negative consideration

Potential benefits include the creation of an additional resource available at the battlefield command level rather than the national asset level of spy satellites, freeing expensive satellites up for other tasks. Other benefits include improved pictures and easier eavesdropping on low-power communications duwe to greater proximity, relative cheapness when compared to advanced satellite programs and establishing cellular networks, and the ability to remain on station for very long periods of time. Finally, many of these craft are both outside the normal range of many aircraft and SAMs and resist deflating quickly when punctured, because the pressure inside is close to that of the surrounding air.

The fact that "near space," unlike outer space, is considered part of a country's airspace and hence sovereign territory is considered both a positive and a negative consideration.

DID coverage of blimps, balloons, and lighter-than-air craft (LTAs)

 

 

 

Airship DZ-N1

http://www.rosaerosystems.pbo.ru/english/projects.html